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Athens, Greece: Day Thirteen

December 29, 2011

Posted by Kanga.

golden lion head

We finally got to the National Archaeological Museum during open hours. It is always interesting to see ancient artworks and how finely detailed they sometimes are. This lion and bull are from royal graves in Mycenae ca. 16th century B.C. (approximately 3500 years ago)

a long horn bull's head, golden horns, golden nose and a golden flower on it's forehead

DaddyBird got to hang out with Poseidon.

large marble statue of the god of the sea

I found this fellow below compelling. This is part of a full size sculpture of a philosopher. He was found in a shipwreck. Only the bronze bits survived. Just imagine the artist spending numerous hours/days/weeks/months creating this, but before it can be installed in its intended display place, it goes down with the ship. If only the artist could know that over 2000 years later it would be one of the most photographed items in a museum. I sat and watched as others came through the doorway, saw him and immediately pulled out their cameras.

bronze sculpture of a bearded man's head

How many tries did it take to get a picture of this horse and rider without someone walking through the picture? At least four. It is a rather amazing piece.

They don’t seem to be able to make up their mind whether this is Zeus throwing a lightning bolt or Poseidon throwing his trident. Since the weapon is missing, there is no clue.

large bronze sculpture of Zeus posed as if he is throwing a lightning bolt

The woman standing to the left was interesting to watch. She was almost floating around the room with a beatific look on her face.

To see the rest of the pictures, click here.

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2 comments

  1. We have enjoyed following your travels online!

    We had no choice! 😉


  2. The Poseidon with Paul needed something in his hand also-and the ‘naked god’ with no name is amazing-the way his feet are holding himself, it must have been something pretty heavy he was throwing! I also love the story of the philosopher who survived. His is an arresting face.



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